I have to admit that I’m very good at self-motivating. Almost too good.

I often feel guilty if I am ‘wasting’ time doing anything other than working towards achieving my goals. So, listening to a book about motivation wasn’t that high on my list.

But after hearing so many great things about Drive (and also managing to pick it up in an Amazon Audible sale) I thought I’d give it a go.

Audiobook: Drive by Daniel H. Pink

This audiobook is just under six hours long, and it looks at the surprising truth about what motivates us, and also, how we can motivate other people.

The author, Dan Pink, uses science to demonstrate that what we think we know about motivation is all wrong.

The old ‘carrot and stick’ approach

If we were asked to motivate and lead a team, more than likely, we would use the ‘carrot and stick’ approach.

In other words, if someone did something right, they would be rewarded. But if they did something wrong, they would be reprimanded.

The author examines why that old-style approach is not effective and looks at how it can sometimes lead to even poorer performance.

Once the myth of the carrot and the stick is busted, the author goes on to look at how different approaches (based on scientific research) can help to motivate yourself and other people.

Methods of motivation

As I listened to the audiobook and the various methods that the author suggested, I could see the methods in my own behavior.

I understood how and why they worked because they made logical human-behavioral sense.

One common method of motivating people that the author touched on was offering more money or a bonus. This method only works up to a certain point.

If a person is struggling to meet their monthly financial commitments, the opportunity of receiving a bonus will be highly motivating for them.

However, if a person has already reached a certain level of financial security and luxury, then extra cash is going to be less motivating.

In which case, the author takes a more scientific approach to explore how other methods of motivating people can be more effective.

Based on science

Throughout the book, there’s a common theme:

“What science knows and what business does.”

The book takes the scientific results from various experiments, tests, and trials, and then compares them to how businesses try to motivate their teams.

Usually, there is a stark difference between the two.

I also want to point out in this section that although the book is all about the scientific approach to motivation, the language used is very easy to understand, so you won’t be blinded by scientific jargon and terminology!

My thoughts

Overall, I enjoyed this audiobook and would have no problem recommending it.

Although I didn’t get that much out of the book personally (as mentioned, I’ve never had a problem with motivating myself) it would be a valuable read for anyone who manages a team, especially those with a performance-driven team, for example, a sales team.

Have you listened to Drive?

This audiobook review is my personal opinion and experience of Drive.

If you’ve read this book, share your thoughts in the comments section, and give the book your own review in the box below. 

Roseanna x

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Drive

8.5

Overall, I enjoyed this audiobook and would have no problem recommending it. The author, Dan Pink, uses science to demonstrate that what we think we know about motivation is all wrong. This would be a valuable read for anyone who manages a team, especially those with a performance-driven team, for example, a sales team.

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Roseanna
Currently winging my way through life and putting most of it on the internet. This is my personal website where I share my business book reviews, my adventure tips and stories, and my general musings on life as a solo entrepreneur.

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1 Comment

  1. Sounds like a good book. Is it a long book? If so, does it repeat itself? Thanks for this recommendation.

    1. It’s about 6 hours long and doesn’t repeat 🙂 There are a couple of points that are re-inforced, but I wouldn’t describe this book as having regurgitated content.

  2. Wow. That is amazing. I got to take a look at this book too.

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