Wealth Building

Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki


I had this book for a few months before I was actually able to read it. If you want to know why then check out the YouTube video above where I share a little story about a friend of mine who I was trying to encourage into reading.

About Rich Dad Poor Dad

Rich Dad Poor Dad is all about the basic principles of building wealth and increasing financial education.

In the book, Robert Kiyosaki has two dads. His biological father, who he calls his poor dad, and his friend’s dad, who he calls his rich dad.

Both of his dads were well educated and successful in their own right. His poor dad held a Ph.D. and was a lecturer, and his rich dad was an entrepreneur.

Throughout this book, Kiyosaki compares the wealth building advice he gets from his rich dad to that he gets from his poor dad.

But both of them have very different views and behaviors when it came to money and wealth, and these difference are what made one of them the richest man in Hawaii, and the other earning just enough to cover his bills every month.

These stories are meant to be true, but there are some debates about whether Kiyosaki did indeed have two dads. Personally, I don’t think it really matters if they’re true or not, the example of having two dads helps to illustrate the principle of the book – which is what the rich teach their kids about money, that the poor and middle class do not.

The book’s structure

The book starts off as a story detailing some of the events, conversations, and lessons that Kiyosaki had with both of his dads.

It then transitions from a story into financial lessons about building wealth.

At the end of each chapter, there is a recap along with a study session. By taking the time to answer the questions laid out in the study sessions, it helps you to understand how the principles Kiyosaki is teaching can be applied to your own life.

When reading the book from front to back, the chapter recaps are a bit annoying because you end up reading the same information again (eventually, I just skipped them), but they would be very useful when re-visiting the book as they would give you a quick refresh without you having to read the whole book again.

Cashflow and financial statements

Mentioned throughout the book is a game called Cashflow that Kiyosaki had created.

Although this is actually a board game, you can play it online – just click here. 

After reading the book, I went and played Cashflow and it helped me to cement the principles that I had just been taught, as well as being able to see how they played out in ‘real-life’.

One thing that I took away from that game was the Personal Financial Statement – and I mean I literally took it away!

Your Personal Financial Statement pops up during your turn after you have rolled the dice. This allows you to see your current financial position which helps you assess what action you should take during your move.

I loved the way this information was presented, so I went a downloaded a free copy of the spreadsheet from the Rich Dad website (you can get it from here) and I now use it in my own financial accounts.

My book review scores

Here’s how I scored Rich Dad Poor Dad based on the criteria above.

Quality of information

The amount of time that I put into reading this book compared to the amount of information that I managed to get out of it, puts this book at the top of the scoreboard for the quality of information.

It was super valuable.

Related Read: The TWO Value Exchanges of a Book You NEED to Know

Readability

Although at times Kiyosaki was explaining concepts that could be deemed as very confusing and complicated, it never felt that way.

The book was very easy to read and the principles easy to understand.

I especially liked the diagrams that he used to show the flow of money – although these were very simple, they were very helpful.

Design and layout

I bought the mass-market paperback version of Rich Dad Poor Dad (which is kinda like a miniature shrunk down version) and it was absolutely fine!

Now, if you’re a frequent visitor to my blog or YouTube channel, you may remember that I marked another book down quite heavily because of its mass market paperback. (The book was Barking Up The Wrong Tree by Eric Barker)

Although this is still a teeny-tiny book, it did not impact on my reading. The font was still a decent size, and because the cover is laminated it stood up to the aggressive bending that you have to do for small but thick books.

My thoughts

Overall, this was a brilliant book to read!

It was enjoyable, insightful, and highly educational. I truly feel as though I am better off for reading it and would highly recommend it to anyone – especially all entrepreneurs.

Have you read Rich Dad Poor Dad?

As always, these reviews are simply my own opinion and I love to hear your thoughts on these books.

If you have read Rich Dad Poor Dad please leave your own review of the book in the box below. 

Roseanna x

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Rich Dad Poor Dad

9.7

Rich Dad Poor Dad is all about the basic principles of building wealth and increasing financial education. Overall it was a brilliant book to read! It was enjoyable, insightful, and highly educational. I truly feel as though I am better off for reading it and would highly recommend it to anyone - especially all entrepreneurs.

Product Review

Design & Layout 9
Readability 10
Quality of Information 10
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Roseanna
Currently winging my way through life and putting most of it on the internet. This is my personal website where I share my business book reviews, my adventure tips and stories, and my general musings on life as a solo entrepreneur.

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